402a6489smallStudents who wish to study Geography should have demonstrated at least Level 5 in Year 10 MYP Humanities.

Year 11 2017 and Year 12 2018, Year 12 2017

Geography is the study of the patterns and processes which are fundamental to the dynamic earth. As such it seeks to describe and interpret the spatial elements which make up the physical and human world, focusing on the interactions which impact on daily life. Geography applies both scientific and socio-economic methodologies to evaluate distributions and movements, at both local and global scales. The subject aims to provide students with the tools needed to critically evaluate complex problems.

Geography promotes a concern for global issues and exposes students to real world examples so that they can be better prepared to engage in an increasingly interconnected world. As a synthesising subject, Geography has a unique perspective on the world and is well placed to take part on commentary and debate on major issues confronting the world today.

Core Themes

The course aims to introduce students to the big themes of World Geography. Students complete four units under the Core Topic of Patterns and Change. These are:

  • Populations in Transition
  • Disparities in Wealth and Development
  • Patterns in Environmental Quality and Sustainability
  • Patterns of Resource Consumption

Students gain an understanding of the major movements of population around the world and the factors contributing to inequalities in wealth and other measures of development. Methods of studying population are introduced and issues concerning gender and ways of reducing disparity are discussed. Initiatives such as the United Nations Millennium Development Goals are used to reflect on development progress. Resource production and consumption patterns are studied and concepts such as ‘ecological footprint’ investigated as methods of measuring the impact of consumption. Understanding climate change, soil degradation and patterns of water scarcity and quality form the basis of environmental studies in the Geography course.

Students are challenged to use the most recent sources and case studies to support their understandings of the themes and the full range of multi-media resources are used to highlight examples.

Fieldwork 

Candidates for both Standard Level and Higher Level undertake one piece of fieldwork which is internally assessed and externally moderated by the International Baccalaureate Organisation. Students are expected to collect data on a topic related to the course and complete an individual structured report. Data collection and collation is usually done as a class group. The local area provides a host of easily assessable sites for fieldwork covering both Physical and Human Geography topics. This is a major focus of the Geography course and emphasis is placed on learning fieldwork techniques, conducting primary research and linking to theory.

Optional Topics

In addition to the Core Topics, students are required to study focus units from the following list – with Standard Level students completing two, and Higher Level three:

  • Freshwater – Issues and Conflicts
  • Oceans and their Coastal Margins
  • Extreme Environments
  • Hazards and Disasters – Risk Assessment and Response
  • Leisure, Sport and Tourism
  • The Geography of Food and Health
  • Urban Environments

Students taking Geography at Higher Level must also study the following Extension Unit: Global Interactions

The IB Geography course provides students with an understanding of the systems and interactions which are fundamental in coming to

terms with change in the world. While the scope of the course is broad, students are grounded in Geography theory and skills. The

dynamic nature of the world geography ensures that the course is always exciting and relevant.

Click here to view Subject Brief – Geography SL Click here to view Subject Brief – Geography HL

Year 10 2017 for Year 11 2018

 Geography is a dynamic subject that is grounded in the real world and deals with some of the major concerns of our time, so students will be studying key contemporary issues like poverty, climate change, globalisation, geopolitical issues and loss of biodiversity.

 

Geographers focus on the interactions between individuals, societies and the physical environment in both time and space, so we will explore these ideas by looking at the challenges facing communities who live for example in urban environments, and in zones of conflict, such as the coastal margins.

 

Geography is about identifying trends and patterns in these interactions and examining the processes behind them. We also investigate the way people adapt and respond to change and evaluate management strategies associated with change. Central to this is a consideration of different perspectives, economic circumstances and cultural diversity.

 

The answers to the broad and complex questions faced by geographers require the use of approaches from various fields. We call this a holistic approach. Geographers are good at seeing how all the pieces of the puzzle fit together.

 

In Geography, we aim to develop your international understanding and to help foster a concern for global issues. This subject encourages you to appreciate our shared responsibility as citizens of an increasingly interconnected world, and to develop the values and attitudes to help you reach a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve some of these issues. This is why you will find geographers working in international development agencies, resource management, politics, business and environmental agencies.

 

The course aims to introduce students to the big themes of World Geography. Students are challenged to use the most recent sources and case studies to support their understandings of the themes and the full range of multi-media resources are used to highlight examples.

 

Core Theme

All HL and SL students complete three units under the Core Topic of Global Change. These are:

  • Population Distribution – changing population
  • Global climate – vulnerability and resilience
  • Global resource consumption and security

 

Students gain an understanding of the major movements of population around the world and the factors contributing to inequalities in wealth and other measures of development. Methods of studying population are introduced and the issues concerning the growth and decline of national populations are discussed. Initiatives such as the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals are used to assess human progress. The threats posed by climate change will be analysed, so will the strategies that mitigate and adapt against such challenges. Resource production and consumption patterns are studied and concepts such as ‘ecological footprint’ investigated as methods of measuring the impact of consumption. Understanding climate change, soil degradation and patterns of water scarcity and quality form the basis of environmental studies in the Geography course.

 

Geographical Themes

HL Geography students must study any three themes. For SL students, the study of any two themes is required.

  • Freshwater: drainage basins
  • Oceans and coastal margins
  • Extreme environments
  • Geographical hazards
  • Leisure, sport and tourism
  • Food and health
  • Urban environments

 

HL Extension
The HL extension theme focuses on the global interactions, flows and exchanges arising from the disparities that exist between places. It presents important and contestable geographic issues of change in space and time for the HL student to question. This part of the syllabus is divided into three topics relating to global interactions. Each topic has a conceptual base that is developed through the content.

  • Power, places and networks
  • Human development and diversity
  • Global risks and resilience

 

Fieldwork

Candidates for both Standard Level and Higher Level undertake one piece of fieldwork which is internally assessed and externally moderated by the International Baccalaureate Organisation. Students are expected to collect data on a topic related to the course and complete an individual structured report. Data collection and collation is usually done as a class group. The local area provides a host of easily assessable sites for fieldwork covering both Physical and Human Geography topics. This is a major focus of the Geography course and emphasis is placed on learning fieldwork techniques and conducting primary research, link to theory.

 

The IB Geography course provides students with an understanding of the systems and interactions which are fundamental in coming to terms with change in the world. While the scope of the course is broad, students are grounded in Geography theory and skills. The dynamic nature of World Geography ensures that the course is always exciting and relevant.

 

Standard Level Assessments

Fieldwork Report – 25%

Examination – 75%

 

 

Higher Level Assessments

Fieldwork Report – 20%

Examination – 80%